Katie Kubont
Katie Kubont

I was born in Sault Ste. Marie Canada on a stormy winter night (it was destined) and raised in Sault Ste. Marie MI. I now live in Marquette MI and love it. I am a true Yooper that developed a passion for climbing amongst my passion for fitness of all types. The first ice wall experience was at The Curtains in Munising Michigan in 2009 and blossomed when I went to 11 Mile Canyon in CO 2014 and shimmied up a rock wall with ease. The holds were minimal and the height more than I thought I could handle. Reaching the top of that climb with sweat puddles in my shoes and dirt on my face made me smile. I feed off of experiences that challenge me and that also offer a feeling of gratification and accomplishment. The feel of the rock under your nails and the grip of the ice picks is pleasure. Fighting through the “screaming barfies” and making it to the top makes the hurt worth it. Never give in to the “Elvis leg” and just keep pushing. We all can do it. No wall is the same. That’s what keeps you going. I continue to challenge myself to make the next climb harder than the previous. Start small and work your way up. Build that confidence. Put more and more rock ledges and ice chunks below you. Challenge yourself with negative temperatures, high heat and various level of difficulty. Find what turns you on. I know I sure did.

Nick Shelson
Nick Shelson

My name is Nicholas Shelson, and I've been passionate about being outdoors ever since I grew up near the woods in my childhood home. I owe it to these woods, which have open the gate to exploring further in life. Progress in life for me is represented by moving forward, not within status or comparison in societies, but rather pushing myself where I have not physically, and mentally been. As I learn from dissapointment in myself when I can't compete to my own standards, I find courage within. The courage within releases into momentive thought; leading to stronger progress.

Stay focused in every moment - as you own it. Allow the fear to fill in as it comes, but don't allow it to conquer you.

Doug Huha
Doug Huha

My name is Doug Huha and playing music is my passion. I got my first drum kit as a gift for my eleventh birthday and hit the ground running from there.

Playing and performing music means everything to me. Turning a simple idea that starts so small in your head into a full song that gets people moving and singing along is an amazing feeling. After investing countless hours of thought, work and practice into a song, watching people enjoy that song enough to share it with others makes it all worth while.

I plan for a future with music. As cool as it would be to become some super famous rock star, I don't need that. If I can play music, keep a roof over my head and have some fun in the process then I will be living the dream.

Jocelyn Bedard
Jocelyn Bedard

Dancing lets me say all of the things that I can’t put into words. I can share an emotion, a story, or a memory, without saying a word. That’s pretty cool if you ask me. Dance is a passion, not a hobby. It means that I can be myself and express who I am through technical and creative movements. I turn to dance on good days and on bad days and get more joy from it each time. I did not grow up in a dance studio; you won’t find any baby pictures of me in a tutu.

I started dancing in high school when I finally had the guts to give it a try. I immediately fell in love with it and decided to join a dance studio and get the experience I needed. Before I knew it, I was dancing in competitions, recitals, and even some music videos. I’ve been dancing for eight years now, at 22 years old, and strive to dance for many more. I don’t know where dancing will lead me to; I think that’s what makes it so fun. So for now… I’ll simply just dance.

Joey Acott
Joey Acott

I'm Joey Acott, a 27-year-old graphic designer who currently lives in downtown Windsor. Photography is by far my biggest and most expensive hobby; it fills me with every emotion from love to hate. The amount of joy photography brings me from accidently stumbling upon the perfect shot can leave me feeling high on life for days – or even weeks – validating all of my hard earned time and money on something so beautiful. It’s an incredible feeling! I am the world’s greatest photographer when I’m in the zone and fuck anyone else who ever bought camera because I RULE! You can’t sit with my colour tones. But the weight of my anxiety, self loathing and depression couldn’t be any heavier while I awkwardly set up a shot or edit crappy photos from a shoot I spent 4 hours trying to light. Why on earth would I abuse my finances and life on something so aggravating that I’ll never be good at or make money from?! Why do I even try when there are a million other photographers with skills a billion times better than mine!? Why don’t I know as much as them!? How come they always have better gear than me! How come every photographer knows more about gear than me!? I’m going to quit photography this is stupid!  FUCK this stupid hobby, I’m going to buy a car or a house with all this money I’ll be saving.  Live a normal life.

17-year-old me took a photography course in high school where I learned how to properly adjust my shutter/aperture and then develop film. It was by far my favourite class of my secondary schools years because we were given so much freedom to go seek out shots and capture moments in time they way I wanted them to be. What other high school class would allow you to go out to the park or football stadium unsupervised and just look at things? This feeling of liberation and exploration was enough to get me hooked and why I still value photography so religiously today. Plus it was fun smooching girls in the dark room.  “I REALLY want to develop this roll of film I shot today, Mr. Leopolde. Can I have the keys to the dark room at lunch?”

I hope photography brings me to places I never expected to be or see. It would obviously be amazing to make money off it, but that’s not why I’m so involved. I do it because I want to be neck deep in the most surprising and uncomfortable situations. I want to take pictures in a cave in the Galápagos Islands (are there even caves there?) or photograph your nana dying. I really don’t want to take your engagement photos though – unless you can promise a Komodo dragon will bite nana’s throat off in the Galápagos while we shoot inside a cave.

If you’re interested in taking photos or getting better all you need to do is take more pictures. Seriously, it’s literally the only way to get better. You have to take a zillion crappy photos before you are even half-decent, which kind of sucks because you never realize how horrible you were until later. And then you feel like shit knowing you were so shit. But the best thing is knowing you’re shit and being able to look back at your shit photos a year, or months, later and say “Wow I knew I was shit, but I didn’t know I THAT shit. SHHIIITT!” That’s the best. Being able to tell that you’re getting better! And you won’t get better until you take more photos! You can’t win the lottery if you never play, ya know? But you might as well not even try though, cause I’m the best photographer. I mean, I totally have a Canon 5D MK III. I bet you didn’t even know that’s a full-frame camera?! Loser! Or maybe you did know and now I’m thinking about how I don’t even own a soft box. Fuck. And I’m like three months behind on editing four different shoots and one of them I thought it would be a good idea to only use one light directly on the subject and I’m trying to fix it with terrible fake Photoshop shadows and this is so stupid I’m going to crawl in bed and YouTube Annie Leibovitz behind the scenes so I can rip her off and now I hate myself and  I’m not original! What the fuck why am I the worst photographer...

Nathan Laughland
Nathan Laughland

Hi, my name is Nathan Laughland, I’m finishing up my bachelor’s degree in Communications, Media and Film at the University of Windsor. Through my degree I’ve pursued knowledge/insight, experience, as well as technique, practice, and protocol, in video and film production. Film, movies, and media, have always been a personal interest; it was not until University that I discovered I might like to get involved in the process myself. During my first year of CMF I made a short experimental narrative with a few friends over the winter holidays, and I’ve been hooked ever since.

Film/Movie making, for me, is a passion and hobby, a personal interest that gives me insight both into external and internal forms of truth. I’ve discovered more about myself through film making, than I have when creating with any other art form. For me, it’s an enlightening process, both in the creation of new images and then later through editing. I love it so very deeply, and I feel at ease, calm, collective, and powerful when I’m creating.

What fuels me to continue, is knowing the true potential of conveying messages through imagery and sound. I know in a greater way that I can impact people’s lives positively. That’s enough evidence for me to want to continue what I’m doing. For me, the art of cinema is the most important tool we could ever fuel passionately and energetically. It is one of the many keys to new gateways of truth.

Walter Riggi
Walter Riggi

WHO? I'm Walter Riggi and I love to produce audio visual media for clients.

WHAT? I enjoy the process of concept to completion. The best is when a client hums a tune into their phone and would like a radio ready musical piece. OR when a client has a picture on their phone and wants to create a movie. When it's this pure and humble the creative juices start flowing.

START? I began producing audio/visual works in 1982.

MEANING? I love living in my brain's creative side. This brings me peace and having this peace is the best meaning of life.

LEAD ME? Every project that I'm involved in leads me to meet other individuals or companies that are looking to bring ideas to fruition. So one idea leads me to other ideas and I stay in my brain's creative side.

ENCOURAGEMENT? Never give up and never work for free. If you have to work for free, then it's a project of love and by your choosing.

Michael Difazio
Michael Difazio

My name is Michael Difazio, I am a reclaim artist. My passion is taking old unwanted/no longer use able objects and turning them into use able materials for unique piece of art and furniture. I started doing this 5 years ago now, turning old wooden windows into mirrors, chalkboards and lots of other things.

To me, my company is fun. It allows me to be creative and let's me test my skill. There's no book for the work I do, so learning how to do something is based on experience alone.

Rick Dawes
Rick Dawes

Passsion:
Telling stories and grabbing your attention with multi-media platforms - photo-video-audio-print
 

Spark:
Photography. It began as an interest, developed into a hobby and led me to what is now a blossoming career in journalism and multi-media production. I bought and taught myself on a Canon DSLR around age 18. Ever since, my camera has always been close. I’ve come to learn people have very short attention spans but if you can grab them, you can take people on a ride.

Meaning:
It gives me something to do, a reason to explore and a vehicle to take me places in life.

Destination:
The joy of the job is that it’s the journey that counts. My pay is the experiences I’ll collect, capture and tell. Who wouldn’t want to be known for living an exciting life?

My Fire:
There will always be someone out there better than you, at anything. This idea keeps me in a self-improvement mindset, so as long as I’m better than I was yesterday, last week or last year, I’m moving forward in my mind. If you aren’t moving forward, you’re falling behind.

Motto:
Just get started.

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